Advocacy


November 2017 Elections


Advocacy is one of the four pillars of GSBA in our mission to combine business development, leadership, and social action to expand economic opportunities for the LGBT community and those who support equality for all. Founded with a social justice mission,GSBA is proud to be an avowedly progressive business organization. Representing the voice of our community, of our businesses, and of our nonprofits is critical. It is the membership that drives our policy work - each of our civic engagement events is organized by and for our members. 

Durkan & Moon: LGBTQ affairs at the City

Durkan & Moon: Listening to small businesses

Grant, Mosqueda, & Murakami: HIV/AIDS policy

Grant, Mosqueda, & Murakami: Seattle's Small Businesses

Calkins & Creighton: Diversity at the Port of Seattle

Hear All The Candidates' Answers

All the videos from our September 22 Face to Face event can be found on our YouTube channel.

Blog posts about the event can also be found here: City Council, Port of Seattle, Seattle Mayor.
While GSBA is not able to feature every political race on stage during our civic engagement events, candidates from other races are invited to submit electronic questionnaires. They will be posted here as we receive them. 

Additionally, any active GSBA member running for office has the opportunity to share a letter to their fellow members. For the November 2017 election, Ryan Calkins, Jenny Durkan have submitted letters.

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GSBA Blog: Advocacy Posts


GSBA Helps Shape Mayor's Commercial Affordability Recommendations

| Sep 29, 2016

On Wednesday, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray’s Commercial Affordability Advisory Committee released recommendations to help ensure Seattle remains an affordable and equitable place for small businesses. The Committee, which was made up of small business owners, developers, and members of the arts and music communities developed recommendations that build upon Mayor Murray’s continued focus on affordability in Seattle, including increasing the minimum wage to $15.00 per hour and addressing housing affordability and livability through HALA.


These recommendations include many suggestions that have been of concern to GSBA members in the Small Business Advisory Council, the Seattle Entrepreneurial Women affinity group, and the Public Policy Task Force. GSBA Public Policy & Communications Manager Matt Landers and GSBA member Dennis Comer (Brown Sugar Baking) participated on the committee.

“Affordability is vital to Seattle’s future. Whether it is ensuring people can make a living wage, afford to live where they work or start a business, we must address affordability from every direction,” Mayor Ed Murray said. “Seattle’s small businesses are what make Seattle a city we love to work and live in. As the city grows, we must maintain the uniqueness and high quality of life made possible by small businesses today.”

“I want to thank the Commercial Affordability Advisory Committee for their work and their recommendations,” Brian Surratt, Director of the Mayor’s Office of Economic Development, said. “The recommendations will be instrumental as we work to fulfill Mayor Ed Murray’s goal for an affordable Seattle.”

The committee’s recommendations were the culmination of collaboration between small businesses and developers.

“The interests of small business owners and developers really are aligned,” committee member and local developer Liz Dunn said. “Developers who think strategically about the neighborhoods they are working in, understand that creating space which is attractive and affordable for small businesses is an essential ingredient for good development and for creating long term value for residents and property owners.  Building spaces that feel like they belong in a neighborhood, and add character to it, create a pedestrian-friendly experience and a true sense of place.”

“Pioneer Square is a neighborhood that demonstrates how growth and small businesses can thrive together while preserving the arts and the historical legacy of the neighborhood all while paving the way for the future,” Karen True, Director of Business Development for the Pioneer Square Alliance, said. “The balance between new development in Pioneer Square and the interests of small business was a model as we developed our recommendations. I’m pleased the committee recommendations include tools for small business owners as well as property owners and developers.”

“As an immigrant and a small business owner, it is important to me that Seattle remains a place where anyone can start a business who has a good idea,” Solomon Dubie, owner of Café Avole, said. “The Commercial Affordability Advisory Committee worked hard to recommend ideas that will keep Seattle affordable for small businesses.”

Click here for video and the original press release.